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Instructions

Instructions

New Mexico Plant Kits

Desert plants are unique — they require very little water, lots of light, they can withstand extreme temperatures, and they're incredibly hardy. The following are suggestions for growing a successful desert garden wherever you happen to live:

STEP 1 Soak the soil pellet in warm water for at least five minutes. It will grow exponentially and become a perfect nest for your seeds.

STEP 2 With the small clay pellets still in the bottom of the planter, put the expanded soil pellet on top and then place the whole planter back in the clear plastic "greenhouse." (Don't separate the soil or peel apart the fine netting holding it together — it will eventually disintegrate after the plants have established.)

STEP 3 Sow the seeds in the small opening at the top of the soil pellet, just below the surface. Make sure the seeds aren't exposed to the light. 

STEP 4 Close the greenhouse lid. Green chile seeds will start to germinate immediately, and you should notice a sprout or two within a couple of weeks. Yuccas take longer and require a faux "winter" (place the whole kit inside the fridge for a month to trick the seeds into thinking it's winter). Cactus seeds are the trickiest, and can take several weeks and, in some cases, several years to germinate. You can increase your odds of success, though, by reading up on online tutorials or YouTube videos. They are incredibly detailed.

STEP 5 Once all three species are ready for "spring," place them in a sunny window or under fluorescent light and keep their temperatures above 75 F, preferably above 85 F. This will kick-start the seeds' springtime, at which point they'll start to sprout. It could take several weeks for signs of growth to appear (for all species), depending on conditions. Don't be discouraged — plants operate at their own pace, not ours, and your first sign of life could easily arrive right before you give up.

STEP 6 Once your seeds sprout, keep an eye on them inside their greenhouse. Once the plants start to approach the lid of the greenhouse, open it up and allow fresh air in. The plants can stay inside their mini pots for at least a month or two, after which you'll want to replant them into a bigger container. Since desert plants are slow growing (except for green chile), they can remain in the greenhouse for weeks or months before transplanting. You can also begin to acclimate the seedlings by placing them outdoors during the day. Once they've become hardy and ready for the outdoors, plant them in your garden!

NOTE Desert plants require lots of heat and tons of direct sunlight. Unless you are growing them in artificial conditions, these plants are best suited for the outdoors. Some countries ban specific plant importation; check with your local customs for details and up-to-date restrictions.

WATERING Don't let the soil pellets dry out. Make sure no standing water is in the bottom of the greenhouse, or root rot could result. Misting with a water bottle is effective; just don't let any part of the soil to dry out or your seedlings will die. Once the yucca and cactus are grown, though, usually about a year, you can cut back on waterings and start mimicking the desert southwest climate. 

 

 

Bonsai Tree Kits and Sensitive Plant Kits — With germination greenhouse!

Bonsai & Sensitive Plant Kits

Bonsai trees are a lifelong commitment and an investment in the future — if cared for properly, a trusty bonsai can outlive you and your grandchildren. The oldest living specimens have been aged at more than 400 years old, and a particularly famous tree is known to have survived a nuclear blast in Japan during World War II.

STEP 1 Soak the soil pellet in warm water for at least five minutes. It will grow exponentially and become a perfect nest for your seeds.

STEP 2 With the small clay pellets still in the bottom of the planter, put the expanded soil pellet on top and then place the whole planter back in the clear plastic "greenhouse." (Don't separate the soil or peel apart the fine netting holding it together — it will eventually disintegrate after the plants have established.)

STEP 3 Sow the seeds in the small opening at the top of the soil pellet, just below the surface. Make sure the seeds aren't exposed to the light. 

STEP 4 Close the greenhouse lid. For sensitive plants, place the whole thing in a bright spot, ideally in a window or under a fluorescent light. For giant sequoia and dwarf Mugo pine bonsai trees, place the whole greenhouse in the refrigerator for one month. This will serve as the seeds' "winter."

STEP 5 After the bonsai tree seeds have germinated in the fridge for a month, take them out and place them in a sunny window or under fluorescent light. This will act as the seeds' springtime, at which point they'll start to sprout. It could take several weeks for signs of growth to appear (for all species). Don't be discouraged — plants operate at their own pace, not ours, and your first sign of life could easily arrive right before you give up.

STEP 6 Once your seeds sprout, keep an eye on them inside their greenhouse. Once the plants start to approach the lid of the greenhouse, open it up and allow fresh air in. The plants can stay inside their mini pots for at least a month or two, after which you'll want to replant them into a bigger container.

NOTE Do not transplant sensitive plants directly into the ground, as they are invasive and will try to overtake any plants nearby. Some countries ban sensitive plant importation; check with your local customs for details and up-to-date restrictions.

WATERING Don't let the soil pellets dry out. Make sure no standing water is in the bottom of the greenhouse, or root rot could result. Misting with a water bottle is effective; just don't let any part of the soil to dry out or your seedlings will die.

Watch a sensitive plant in action on YouTube

Here's a tutorial on growing giant sequoia on YouTube

Age-old Bonsai Trees — Some reach more than 400 years old


Lucky 4-Leaf Clover Kits — Forget falling stars, grow your good luck

Lucky 4-Leaf Clover Kits

One in every 10,000 clovers produces four leaves. Each kit comes with 10,000 seeds (approx.) so you're guaranteed at least one 4-leafed clover. Scatter all the seeds into a flower bed, large pot, vacant lot, or garden plot and then cover in a thin layer of soil or sand. Keep moist for a few days; seeds will begin to sprout within a week, and a full carpet of clovers will clover the seeded area within a couple of months. Be sure to keep seeds dry while in storage, don't expose to excess moisture or light, and keep out of reach of children. No fertilizer is required, as clovers are hardy in all zones. For an indoor clover garden, find a bright windowsill and keep all pets and children away. Clovers can be invasive, so be careful where you plant them. It may be against local or regional laws to import clovers, so check with customs before ordering internationally. Clovers are hardy in cold and hot areas, but may not thrive in dessert or arid environments. Unless otherwise specified, the species included in your kit are crimson clovers, coated with a protective layer to keep the seeds dry and fresh for several years' worth of storage. Plant within two years of purchase to guarantee high germination rates. Trifolium incarnatum is a protein-rich sustenance crop for agriculture and livestock. Clovers grow best in the spring but will germinate year-round. Keep out of reach of children. Seeds are certified organic unless otherwise specified. 

For a detailed step-by-step planting guide, visit here.

Learn how to find a 4-leaf clover on YouTube

Here's a short clover how-to on YouTube


Do-It-Yourself Desktop Garden Terrarium Kit — Use your own bottle (like a boss)

Desktop Garden Kits

Growing your DIY terrarium is simple and regular maintenance is surprisingly low — just find a water-tight vessel and bring a slice of nature right to your desktop. Click on the image below for step-by-step instructions for setting up and establishing your terrarium. Feel free to add your own sand, soil and, if desired, other decor and plants from outside. As long as your terrarium has a lid and stays closed, you only need to water it once a month (or less). For an open-top style, succulents are best. If you notice any foul odors, unusual growths, thick pest infestations, or dark molds, sterilize the surface of the terrarium or start over completely. Just like with a fish tank, it may be necessary to remove all the contents and give the vessel a good scrubbing. For more detailed or technical instructions, refer to Google searches or YouTube tutorials on the subject. Don't be afraid to dive right in; you'll learn what works, and you'll be surprised how resilient nature can be. 

Here's a step-by-step guide to starting your terrarium:


Tropical  Terrarium Kit — With glass jar

Glass Jar Terrarium Kits

Follow the same instructions as above, and add your own soil or pebbles to thicken the layers, depending on style. Feel free to use plant clippings from outside, clones from other houseplants, or chunks of moss or grass from your neighborhood. Succulents make excellent transplants in terrariums, but by using a lid, you can maintain moisture for a woodland or tropic environment. Ferms, mosses, groundcovers, and ivies are ideally suited for terrariums. Use a spray bottle with distilled water to hydrate your terrarium; distilled or purified water won't leave residue on the glass and is healthier for your plants over the long run. 

You can build yours slower, but here's a quick look at your terrarium layers:


Kyoto Moss Spores

Kyoto Moss is a very fine, velvety moss that makes a perfect addition to bonsai tree planters, terrariums, small gardens, or indoor planters. They require cold, moist temperatures to begin growing; you must be able to maintain consistent conditions in order to get this species to grow. It is also a very slow process, taking anywhere from three months to a year to fully spread. Moss grows slow, so patience is virtue. Sprinkle the contents of your baggie onto the surface of your terrarium or bonsai tree and mist with purified or distilled water. Maintain constant moisture, as close to 100 percent as possible, for several months. If the spores dry out, they will stop growing and may die altogether. Temperatures should also be kept low, preferably below 55 degrees F, until moss has fully established. Moss spores will need a little light to begin growing, but not full light, so don't grow them in a refrigerator or dark garage. Keeping the entire terrarium, bonsai tree or planter in an enclosed space with plenty of water is preferred. If you keep the moss covered, mist it at least a couple of times a day to keep the air inside moving. Stagnant air will prevent the moss from growing. You can also cover the area with clear plastic wrap to keep moisture from escaping. The ideal environment for these spores may differ, but they will generally have low, regular light, temperatures between 40 and 55 degrees F with very little fluctuations, constant moisture above 90 percent, and enough surface to "cling" to in order to begin growing. Above all, be patient — moss is a very slow-growing species so don't expect an instantly lush garden. Some mosses take months to grow, but if you provide the right conditions constantly and consistently, you'll have a vibrant green patch of natural "carpet" to enjoy.

 

A few other tips:

• Keep the spores out of direct sunlight while establishing.

• Once the moss establishes, it will spread relatively quickly. Be sure it has room to spread.

• To encourage faster group, rinse some white rice and add the water into a mist bottle, then spray on the spores.

• If established moss dries out, just mist it with purified water and it will perk right up.

• Moss will grow in most soils, and can also take root on rocks, wood, and other surfaces.

• Keep the spores out of heat or direct sunlight. 

• Keep dry until ready to plant.

 

Handmade Terrarium Mushrooms — Available by special order

Still have questions? E-mail us today!